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Mexico water, wastewater chemical market to grow from industrial water demands

Frost-Sullivan-Mexico-water-wastewater

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina, April 15, 2013 — The escalating use of water for industrial processes has spurred the need for water and wastewater treatment, boosting the demand for water and wastewater treatment chemicals in Mexico. Growing awareness on water legislations will continue to drive the market in the country, although major improvements in infrastructure are still required.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.chemicals.frost.com), The Mexican Industrial Water and Wastewater Treatment Chemical Market, finds that the market earned revenues of more than $342.9 million in 2012 and estimates this to reach $473.1 million in 2017.

Fast-growing industries and rising water prices have compelled several plants in Mexico to install their own water treatment facilities, sustaining investments in the country’s treatment chemical market.

“Water regulations at the federal, state and municipal levels in Mexico allow water usage only through authorization, subject to terms and conditions,” said Frost & Sullivan Chemicals, Materials and Food Research Analyst Florencia Benitez Boiardi . “This legal frame accelerates the adoption of chemicals for industrial water and wastewater treatment.”

However, the irregular water availability in Mexico makes sustainability difficult. Water treatment stations are located only near the biggest cities, and the lack of basic infrastructure in peripheral cities and rural areas curb the market’s overall scope.

Environmental organizations’ opposition to the use of chemicals and the discharge of toxic chemicals directly into sewers further hampers the uptake of treatment chemicals. The trend of substituting conventional treatments for other technologies such as membranes, ultrafiltration and ultraviolet rays will also affect chemical suppliers’ revenues.

Nevertheless, the high costs of these non-chemical industrial water and wastewater treatment processes will ensure that chemical treatment remains the process of choice.

“Focusing on technological developments that will enable the re-use of highly polluted wastewater will add to the popularity of chemical treatment methods,” concluded Boiardi. “Vendors must also develop strong relationships with manufacturers to optimize the supply chain and guarantee market sustenance.”
If you are interested in more information on this research, please send an e-mail to Francesca Valente , Corporate Communications, at francesca.valente@frost.com, with your full name, company name, job title, telephone number, company e-mail address, company website, city, state and country.
The Mexican Industrial Water and Wastewater Treatment Chemical Market is part of the Chemicals & Materials Growth Partnership Service program. Frost & Sullivan’s related research services include: Pulp and Paper Chemicals Market in Brazil, Engineering Polymers Market in Colombia, Brazilian Municipal Water and Wastewater Treatment Chemicals Market, Protective Gloves Market in Mexico, Argentinean Automotive Paints and Coatings Market, and Brazilian Engineering Plastics Market, among others. All research services included in subscriptions provide detailed market opportunities and industry trends evaluated following extensive interviews with market participants.

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Taken from WaterWorld: http://www.waterworld.com/articles/2013/04/mexico-water–wastewater-chemical-market-to-grow.html

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This entry was posted on April 15, 2013 by in News Articles and tagged , , , , , , , .
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